American Financial Services Association - Preparing Your Company for Compliance with the Current Expected Credit Loss (CECL) Model | Aug. 3, 2017
American Financial Services Association

Preparing Your Company for Compliance with the Current Expected Credit Loss (CECL) Model | Aug. 3, 2017

Preparing Your Company for Compliance with the Current Expected Credit Loss (CECL) Model | Aug. 3, 2017

Webinar Resources:

Presentation Slides (PDF)

June 2016 was a major milestone with the FASB’s issuance of the long awaited new accounting standard for loan losses. Designated the current expected credit loss model (commonly referred to as “CECL”), the standard requires entities to record credit losses at origination based on a life of loan loss concept. This change will have a significant impact on your company’s capitalization and impact your ability to execute on strategic goals. Learn about the various modeling options for a “life-of-loan” estimate, implementation challenges and best practices to prepare your company for adoption of this required standard. This webinar will also address commonly asked questions such as why the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) changed the rules to the CECL methodology, what the required adoption timeline looks like by type of company, and how this will affect your balance sheet upon adoption.

Presenter:

Heather Cozart, Partner, Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP

Heather Cozart is a Partner in the Raleigh, NC office of Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP. She has more than 18 years of combined experience in public accounting and in the financial services industry. She serves clients ranging from de novo community banks to large multi-billion dollar regional banks, sub-prime and specialty finance companies and broker-dealers. Prior to joining Dixon Hughes Goodman, Heather was the Director of Technical Accounting at a large publicly traded financial services company, where she managed the financial reporting, technical accounting and new business functions. Heather has also worked at the Securities and Exchange Commission in the Division of Corporation Finance, where she reviewed 1933 and 1934 Act filings of community, regional and national banks and other financial services companies. Prior to the SEC, Heather served as a manager at a big four accounting firm. She is a frequent speaker at various industry events and stays active in professional/industry associations and in the local community. Dixon Hughes Goodman LLP is a Business Partner member of the American Financial Services Association.